MG Taylor Modeling Language
Explore the Models
April 17, 1997

A Slice of Reality
At MG Taylor Corporation we refer to a model as a "slice of reality." A vantage point of perception. The Latin derivation, modulus is the diminutive of modus, which means measure, rhythm, harmony. So a model is a little measure, a little rhythm, a little harmony--a slice. Of these three terms, we're perhaps the most familiar with "measure", but the other two are more important to contemplate. We're used to building models to measure things--the effect of air pressure on the surface of a wing, or the profitability of a corporation. We may not be so comfortable with ferreting out models that divine the rhythm and harmony of the world around and in us. Or if we are, we confine those models to the realms of art, philosophy, essay, poetry. But the complexity of the world--even the corporate world--is too deep to be fathomed by measurements alone. Business is art and the Enterprise should call upon the qualities of rhythm and harmony inherent in art for assistance to lead it into the future.

The models that are linked to this page are part of an evolving art form that seeks the measure, rhythm and harmony--a synthesis of the features of the complex world of the evolving enterprise. Each model has several features:

  • a number of components expressed as terms and symbols (glyphs)
  • a spatial arrangement of these components relative to each other and perhaps to some axis such as time
  • additional connections between the components which indicate flow or dependency

The models fall into several categories, but we leave the explorer to imagine these for himself (or herself). Too much definition may dull the process of discovery.

If you're looking for formulas, you won't find them here. If you're looking for patterns, you may wind up staying here for a long time!

The information found in this website is supplemental to information found in the MG Taylor Corporation manual, A Strategic Modeling Language for the 21st Century. The models found here are drawn differently and described differently than in the manual.

For more background on the glyphic aspect of the modeling language, follow this link.

All models of the MG Taylor® Modeling Language are protected by copyright. Please observe these four conditions. in your reference and use of these models.

Currently available models:

Model

Description

Image

Model

Glyphs

Ten Step Knowledge Work Process The engine for processing information from events through a knowledge base, into distribution, into design, and on to subsequent events. model
11/1/96
glyphs
10/30/96
Scan-Focus-Act A basic representation of the creative process in three stages (plus a feedback element). model
11/4/96
glyphs
10/30/96
Business of Enterprise The network-based architecture for linking the functions of production, investment, consumption and management in the Knowledge-based enterprise. model
9/30/96
glyphs
11/2/96
Stages of an Enterprise The Lifecycle of the enterprise including special situations such as overshoot and collapse, turnaround, the entrepreneurial button. model
9/30/96
glyphs
11/2/96
5 E's of Education The necessary and sufficient components of a complete educational package. model
11/4/96
glyphs
11/2/96
Vantage Points Seven shells of context from philosophy to task that must be in place for enterprises to maintain homeostasis. model
11/4/96
glyphs
11/2/96
Seven Domains The seven areas that are managed in every enterprise and every activity of the enterprise. When managed properly they ensure corporate health and allow Knowledge-based organizations to grow and profit. model
11/4/96
glyphs
11/2/96
Seven Stages of the Creative Process The most complex of the creativity models developed by MG Taylor, this model explains how problems are created and then solved in a process that is recursive, fractal, cyclic and nonlinear in character. model
12/18/96
glyphs
12/18/96
'Spoze The 'Spoze model holds the secret for allowing systems to evolve in rapidly changing environments and yet maintain their own homeostasis and identity. Enterprises use 'Spoze to innovate without having to grab on to every new idea that passes by. model
1/13/97
glyphs
1/13/97
Appropriate Response Every stage of the Creative Process involves producing a result. Superior results can be obtained by filtering or testing competing designs through the six elements of this model. model
1/22/97
glyphs
1/22/97
Three Cat We all build mental concepts of how things work by observing reality. But to cement the learning, we must build models that exemplify our concept and test these models against what we observe to confirm our understanding. model
3/16/97
glyphs
3/16/97
Design Build Use The unfolding of a project or creation over time is an interactive, iterative game between the designer, builder and user. However, when we make the process linear, discrete and focused on being "finished", the outcome is a nonliving one. model
3/16/97
glyphs
3/16/97
Creating the Problem This model explores the relationship between vision and condition that creates the "problem." It continues with a description of the tug and pull of creative tension that brings the vision and conditions together to create a new condition. model
7/4/97
glyphs
7/4/97
The Learning Path: Five Points of Mastery Instead of the three traditional roles of education (student, teacher, administrator), we present five: the learner, the sponsor, the expert, the facilitator, and the steward. In high performance environments each individual moves from role to role sometimes in rapid succession and sometimes in cycles that span years. model
7/4/97
glyphs
7/4/97
The Four Step Recreative Process The creative process has many facets and can be understood and practiced from many different vantage points. The Four Step model emphasizes the activity of recreation between each stage of the creative process and shows this recreation as a wave and a particle phenomenon--linear and non-linear approaches. model
7/27/97
glyphs
7/27/97
Design Formation We've borrowed the basic form and vocabulary of this model from the architectural profession. Words like "program" and "contract documents" refer to phases in the creation of a manmade environment. However, this vocabulary lends insight to the creative process in many different professions and types of projects besides architecture and construction. model
2/5/98
glyphs
2/5/98
Best Case Worst Case The future, they say, holds infinite potential. Unfortunately, that does not particularly help us plan ahead. The Best Case / Worst Case model can assist us by creating an "envelope of possibility" for the future of a condition, project or venture. By envisioning the complete range of possible outcomes (and the paths to reach those outcomes), we can more readily understand the implications of our decisions and the value of our current resources. model
4/29/98
glyphs

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